let's get the seven lines. (bookshop) wrote,
let's get the seven lines.
bookshop

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Have you ever had two things seemingly totally unrelated suddenly collide with breathtaking clarity???

That happens to me a lot. However, this is not really like that. It's just cool.

For 7 or 8 years or so Franz Lehar's' "The Merry Widow" has been one of my all-time favourite operettas, in fact, perhaps my very favourite. (It's a toss between that and the Mikado. The first time I saw it performed I fell absolutely in love with it, especially with the Merry Widow Waltz, which I just think is the coolest song ever, and the folk song "Vilja" which is sung at the beginning of act two by the heroine.

The song, "Vilja", is absolutely gorgeous. It tells the story of a hunter who meets a woodmaiden in the forest who enchants him, seduces him, gives him the best sex of his life, and then vanishes in the morning leaving him to wander through the woods helplessly imploring her return. In English for those of you who don't know, the title is pronounced "Veel-ya." All this time I've been going around singing that song, and it never once occurred to me that the "Veelya" in the story was the Veela of Harry Potter. Even though one of the English translations I sing says, "No maiden of mortals so sweetly could kiss."

Somehow due to thoughts inspired by Clefnote I wound up rummaging around on Kazaa for a copy of that song, humming it to myself, and all at once, bam! Vilja=Veela in my puny little brain. So, in my general excitement, I thought that I would share the textual translation of the song for you all.

*
Nun lasst uns aber wie daheim
Jetzt singen unser'n Ringelreim
Von einer Fee, die wie bekannt
Daheim die Vilja wird genannt!
Es lebt' eine Vilja, ein Waldmägdelein,
Ein Jäger erschaut' sie im Felsengestein!
Dem Burschen, dem wurde
So eigen zu Sinn,
Er schaute und schaut'
auf das Waldmägdlein hin.
Und ein niegekannter Schauder
Fasst den jungen Jägersmann,
Sehnsuchtsvoll fing er still zu seufzen an!

Refrain:
Vilja, o Vilja, Du Waldmägdelein,
Fass' mich und lass' mich
Dein Trautliebster sein!
Vilja, O Vilja, was tust Du mir an?
Bang fleht ein liebkranker Mann!

Das Waldmägd'lein streckte
die Hand nach ihm aus
Und zog ihn hinein in ihr felsiges Haus.
Dem Burschen die Sinne vergangen fast sind,
So liebt und so küsst gar kein irdisches Kind.
Als sie sich dann satt geküsst
Verschwand sie zu derselben Frist!
Einmal hat noch der Arme sie gegrüsst:

Vilja, o Vilja, Du Waldmägdelein,
Fass' mich und lass' mich
Dein Trautliebster sein!
Vilja, O Vilja, was tust Du mir an?
Bang fleht ein liebkranker Mann!



*
So let us, however , as at home
Now sing our ring dance rhyme
About a fairy, who, as is known
At home is called Vilja!

There lived a Vilja, a wood-maiden,
A hunter spied her in a rocky cliff!
The fellow became
So strangely affected,
He looked and looked
At the little wood-maiden.
And a never-before-known shudder
Seized the young hunter,
Longingly he began quietly to sigh!

Refrain:
Vilja, O Vilja, you little woods-maiden,
Take me and let me
Be your dearest true love!
Vilja, O Vilja, what are you doing to me?
Fearfully begs a lovesick man!

The woods-maiden stretched
Out her hand to him
And pulled him into her cliff-dwelling.
The lad almost lost his senses, ( for)
Thus loved and kissed no earthly child.

As soon as she was sated with kissing
She disappeared at that moment!
Just once did the poor lad wave to her:

Vilja, O Vilja, you little woods-maiden,
Take me and let me
Be your dearest true love!
Vilja, O Vilja, what are you doing to me?
Fearfully begs a lovesick man!
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